Monday, May 1, 2017

Elisha Kembur Barton and Celestial Eliza McArthur ~ Pioneers of the Month ~ May 2017






Celestial Eliza McArthur got the name "Eliza" from her mother, Eliza Rebecca Scovil, who had been named for her Mother's first cousin, Eliza R. Snow. Celestail's grandmother, Lury Snow, was daughter of Franklin Snow and Lydia Alcott. Franklin was a brother of Oliver, father of the prophet of Lorenzo Snow, and his sister, Eliza R. Snow. Celestial Eliza McArthur, daughter of Duncun McArthur an Eliza Rebecca Scovil, was born in Pleasant Grove, Utah, on February 10, 1860. She was the oldest of four daughters in the second family of Duncun McArthur, three of whom lived.
Duncan McArthur


There had been fourteen children in the first family, five of whom lived. Grandmother was actually part of four different families. She was half-sister to her father's first family; to her step-father's family by his first wife; and to his second family by her mother as well as being a member of her father's second family. Since she as the oldest in a large family, she grew up used to responsibility and hard work. Her step-father, Washington Perry McArthur, who was also her half-brother, was first counselor to Bishop W.S. Seely when the first ward was organized in Mt. Pleasant in July 1859. He was also active in the town government. Elisha Kembur Barton, son of John Barton and Susannah Wilkinson Barton, was born December 22, 1856, in Bountiful, Davis County, Utah. He was the youngest child in a family of eight children--four boys and four girls.


The other children--in order of their birth--were: Mary Catherine, William Gilbert, Elizabeth Jane, Phebe Elen, John Oscar, Emely Alice, and Sylvester Aaron. At age 16, Celestial married Elisha Kembur Barton, age 20, son of other early settlers in Mt. Pleasant, John Barton and Susannah Wilkinson. They, too, had joined the saints form Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, in the early days of the Church, and suffered persecutions and hardships before coming with the company led by Brigham Young across the plains to Utah. IN 1850, Brigham Young asked the Barton family to settle in Bountiful, Davis County, Utah, near Salt Lake City. They lived there nearly ten years, during which time their three youngest children were born, including Grandpa Elisha K. Barton, their youngest.
John Ivie 

After John Ivie of Mt. Pleasant met and married Grandpa’s (Elisha’s) oldest sister, they decided water was more plentiful in Mt. Pleasant, and that farming would be better there. They came there in the year 1860. Most of the people were living in the fort then. Mt. Pleasant had been settled only a year. Celestial Eliza McArthur and Elisha Kembur Barton were married on the 29th of November, 1876, in Mt. Pleasant. They went to Salt Lake City and were married, or sealed, in the Endowment House, a little over a year later, on March 14, 1878. They made their home in Mt. Pleasant.

 For a while they lived on Main Street, until they moved down on the 20 acres of farmland, where they stayed for several years. Later, when their family was larger, they built a large red brick home close to the center of town, on e block east on Main Street. The children helped with the building of this home. They stayed there until their children were grown, and and until both of them passed away. 

I will describe it as I remember it. The Plan of this home was a good for the rearing of a large family. There was a huge square kitchen on the southeast with a handy little pantry just off the south side. A nice south window let in sun just about the sink in this well-arranged pantry, where Grandma kept her dishes, utensils, and equipment for cooking. A small, but complete bathroom was just off the kitchen in the southeast corner, and a big window, which was on the east, gave them lots of sunshine. There was a large dining room, which was used more for a living and sitting room than anything else, on the west side of the kitchen. We would call it a family room today. A large bay window on the south side of this room was always filled with beautiful green plants, ferns, and flowers. There was a parlor on the northwest, and a bedroom on the northeast. The parlor contained a piano and an organ, which were used frequently by this music-loving family. On the west side of the dining room was a porch that led to lawns and fruit trees surrounding the house. 

There was a huge garden spot, and a place for cows, horses, chickens, and pigs. Leading from the kitchen on the north was a hallway which led to the upstairs and to the basement room. The upstairs had three large bedrooms and a balcony porch off on of them, on the west side. These rooms were not only used by the children, but by relatives, and guests. The basement room, well finished with brick, was a good, cool, place for the storage of fruits, vegetables, and meats. The walls were flat rocks. 

Thirteen children were born to them--six boys and seven girls. They were-- in order of their birth--Offa Celestial (who died when she was fourteen months old from choking on a pit), Alice Loretta, Kembur LeRoy, Henry Lawrence (my father), John Amos, Noah (who died two days after birth, from an overdose of paregoric), Eva Eliza, Williard “W” (named from a story in the “Juvenile Instructor”), Lloyd McArthur, Hazel Ermina, Sarah Elizabeth, Susan Mildred, and Grace Adelaide. Shortly after Kembur and Celestial were married, he took a load of wheat to Salt Lake in a wagon drawn by two yoke of oxen. Then he bought a charter oak stove, which was about half the size of an ordinary cooking stove of later days. They considered it very fine. Cedar wood, from the cedar hills, was used to burn in it. There was no coal then. People hauled wood all winter long, while the snow was deep. They pulled trees down with oxen, or cut them down. Sylvester and Kembur had their farms together, and worked together for years, until Kembur’s boys, Roy, Lawrence, and Amos, became older, and wanted their farm separate. 

Grandpa Kembur Barton was a good farmer and stockman and a very hard worker. He is always had a nice herd of cattle. Like the Bartons before and after him, he loved good well-bred horses, and always kept an excellent team. For seven generations, the Bartons had been farmers. At one time, Grandpa owned a large sheep herd, but sold it and went into the creamery business. He and his family gathered milk and cream all around town. Celestial, first person at the left in row three, is shown with other members of the “Sunshine Club,” an organization similar to the Relief Society.
Sunshine Club


Retty is second to the right of the man in the back row. The third child from the right in the first row looks like Grace. Grandpa was a short, stocky-built man, 5 feet 6 inches tall, with black curly hair, and grayish blue eyes. He was a natural-born musician. After hearing any tune two or three times, he could play it well on his accordion. He played his accordion frequently for the old time dances they had. He also played the harmonica, and chorded on the organ for the whole family to gather ‘round and sing.’

 They had many happy times together as a family. Most of the children were talented in music. All of them had the natural talent to sing well, as did their mother. Willard stood on the stage when he was three years old, and played tunes on the harmonica. Perhaps the thing I remember most about family gatherings was the brothers and sisters gathering around the piano and singing many beautiful songs. I love the harmony and the rich soprano voices. 

Briant Jacobs told me some time ago how he remembered my Grandmother and the way she bore her testimony in the ward. She would go up to the piano, pick up the hymn book, and sing a favorite hymn, then return to her seat without saying a word. One hymn that she sang was “I Know That My Redeemer Lives.” Grandma proved to be a wonderful homemaker and helpmate. She was very skillful and economical at managing the home under any conditions. She was an excellent cook, housekeeper, and seamstress. 

The whole house reflected not only good housekeeping, but the expert handiwork of Grandma and her girls. There were nice covers on the couches, beautiful cushions, and a general feeling of comfort and well-being, as well as orderliness throughout the house. Grandma seemed to possess an ability to make little go far. She made several hundred quilts, which were skillfully done, from scraps of material. She did a great deal of sewing of clothing and other articles. She was efficient in all that she did, and could accomplish a great deal of work in a minimum amount of time. Many people have told me that she could whip up a meal faster and better than anyone they had ever seen. Grace said that she never saw her mother come to the breakfast table without her hair combed and a clean apron. 

Every tramp that came into town stopped at Grandma’s house to be fed. SHe would fix lunch for them while they chopped an armful of wood. Grandma kept boarders part of the time to help feed the family. She and the family sold butter and milk. The children used to pick and help dry apples up at Aunt Lib’s (Libby Everett, Will Everett’s wife) for their family and Aunt Lib’s. They took care of lodge halls also.

 Grandma spent part of her time as a nurse caring for the sick people around town and she went over to the Jacobs family (just through the block) who were all down with flu and helped them. She also helped to bring Dr. Bryant Jacobs into the world. When his mother was having a difficult delivery, Grandma retired to an upstairs bedroom to pray, and came back down to complete the delivery. Everything went better after that and Sister Jacobs was able to successfully deliver her youngest child. Another time when she was riding with President and Sister Jacobs to the temple, the car broke down, and Grandmother went over in the sagebrush and knelt pray. She returned to the car and said, “Let’s go.” They all got in and the car worked fine. Every day she combed her invalid neighbor’s hair. This was Mrs. Hannah Reynolds. Every time she baked, she sent her a little cake or pie. 

About 1900, the family considered moving to Canada to live. On April 9, 1903, Grandpa Barton, and two of his sons-- Lawrence and Amos-- with Ossy Barton and his family, left for Canada. When they left, all that they owned in Mt. Pleasant was promised away. With a company of 17 men, cattle, horses, and car loads of furniture, they traveled to Canada--to Lethbridge, Alberta. When they reached there, they stayed with a Mrs. Heninger, who wa Oscar Ivie’s sister. 

After three or four months stay, they bought a place west of Raymond. In May, a terrible storm arose, which lasted three days and nights. Half of the cattle were lost in the storm. Some were found in the mountains. A bit discouraged, but still determined, Grandfather Barton returned to Utah to get his family and to go back to Canada. Amos became homesick while waiting, and also returned to Mt. Pleasant. Lawrence stayed there (in Canada). On November 9, 1903, after his return, Kembur Barton died suddenly from a quick stroke and heart attack while doing the chores at his home. From then on the older boys, Roy and Lawrence, helped run the farm, and Grandma carried on hearing her family alone as a widow. 

The family did not go to Canada, but stayed in Mt. Pleasant. After Grandpa’s death, Grandma helped clean the sacrament cups each week, and applied the labor on her tithing, which she always paid. Aunt Grace and all helped. I remember Grandmother Barton very well. I think her most outstanding quality was her “serenity.” She did not say much, but was always calm and patient. Her hands were always busy. Around her was order, cleanliness, good food, and cheerfulness. I never saw anything in her house untidy, although there were always relatives there. She is no longer with us, but her spirit continues to influence our lives, and “the ears of the children are turned to those who gave them life.” By June Barton Bartholomew

Saturday, April 1, 2017

Ferdinand Ericksen ~ Pioneer of the Month ~ April 2017


Ferdinand Ericksen 
Ferdinand Ericksen and his first wife, Clementina Marion Morrison
The child is Beatrice.
Tina died soon after giving birth to their third Child Tina 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ferdinand Ericksen and second wife Carrie Lofgren 





Ferdinand Ericksen, son of Lars and  Stena, was born in Mt.  Pleasant, September 30, 1863.  He attended the district schools and took a two year course at B.Y. Academy at Provo.

He taught school for four years in Mt. Pleasant and then entered the Ann Arbor Law College, studying one year.  He was admitted to the bar of Michigan, June 5, 1890 and opened an office in Mt. Pleasant.


He was elected County Prosecuting Attorney in August, 1890 and County Collector in 1892.  In 1897 he was elected mayorl.  He was cashier of the Mt. Pleasant Bank from January 1893 to July 1895, and was a member of the board of directors.  He also had an interest in the Ericksen Meat and Grocery Company.


In 1894, he was elected Major of the National Guard of Utah, and in 1896 was appointed Judge Advocate, with the rank of Major, on Brigadier-General Willard Young's staff.  He was appointed a school trustee in 1896, to fill a vacancy, and in 1897 was elected to that position.

Addendum

He was one of the influential persons to bring about the construction of the Pioneer Monument that stands in front of the Carnegie Library today.



His Speech

"Judge Ferdinand Ericksen, in his presentation speech, gave a brief history of all that had been done by the committees and the source of obtaining the necessary funds for the erection of the monument on the beautiful spot on which it stands, and thanked the ecclesiastical authorities for the privilege of locating it there without cost or consideration for an indefinite period of time. He explained in brief, the inscriptions upon the Monument, the names of the persons inscribed, he said, being representative of many nationalities, and among them were names of noted scholars.. musicians, artists, teachers, etc. Men who would, because of their skill and ability, have achieved distinction in any community. He stated in brief that this determined band of fearless and God-fear¬ing men, together with their wives, who shared their labors and who had come here under most adverse conditions; he said that the now vast rich fields with growing crops, were then covered with sage brush, and that the roads, bridges and canals were yet to be constructed, the churches and temples of learning had not then even been planned. The Opera Houses and Amusement houses were unknown. In fact, there were none of the attractions, or features of civilization to induce those pioneers to come, but on the contrary, the existing conditions at that time were such as to discourage."

"Not only were the elements to be subdued and the arid soil made to produce a livelihood, but the roving and uncivilized Indians had to be met and conquered. In conclusion he stated that it was indeed fitting that we perpetuate the names and deeds d such worthy ancestors, and that this was the underlying and controlling thought and desire in erecting the Memorial. He said that he took great pleasure in performing the duties his commission imposed, and presented the Monument to the community in behalf of all those who had in any manner aided in its construction, to honor of all the pioneers, both men and women, who settled in Mt. Pleasant, as a memorial of the esteem in which the pioneers who had made the present Mt. Pleasant possible, were held."

from Mt. Pleasant History pp 188-189; Hilda Madsen Longsdorf
He died on April 20, 1927 in Salt Lake City.
He married Clementina Marion Morrison in December of 1885, a daughter of William and Mary Margaret Farquhar Morrison. New Family Search shows them to be the parents of three children, Clementina Beatrice, William, and Clementina Marian.  His wife, Clementina died while giving birth to Clementina

He was also a partner to Henry Ericksen in the Ericksen Meat and Grocery for short time.  Henry was a brother-in-law.  Ferdinand had a law office on the second floor of the grocery business.


"In 1898, during the time Ferdinand Ericksen was mayor of the city, the city purchased the north brick schoolhouse, (the now mortuary) corner First North and First West, and in due time, after remodeling it, placing in a heating plant, vaults and cells, suitable furniture, etc.,it became an up-to-date and creditable city hall, and was the first real home the Mt. Pleasant city council had ever known.

The north Public Square was cleared of the brush and burrs, and trees and grass were planted for a city park".  from Mt. Pleasant History pp 179-180 by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

Birth: Sep. 30, 1863
Mount Pleasant
Sanpete County
Utah, USA
Death: 
Apr. 20, 1927
Salt Lake City
Salt Lake County
Utah, USA
Ferdinand Ericksen, son of Lars and Stena, was born in Mt. Pleasant, September 30, 1863. He attended the district schools and took a two year course at B.Y. Academy at Provo.

He taught school for four years in Mt. Pleasant and then entered the Ann Arbor Law College, studying one year. He was admitted to the bar of Michigan, June 5, 1890 and opened an office in Mt. Pleasant.


He was elected County Prosecuting Attorney in August, 1890 and County Collector in 1892. In 1897 he was elected mayorl. He was cashier of the Mt. Pleasant Bank from January 1893 to July 1895, and was a member of the board of directors. He also had an interest in the Ericksen Meat and Grocery Company.


In 1894, he was elected Major of the National Guard of Utah, and in 1896 was appointed Judge Advocate, with the rank of Major, on Brigadier-General Willard Young's staff. He was appointed a school trustee in 1896, to fill a vacancy, and in 1897 was elected to that position.

Addendum

He was one of the influential persons to bring about the construction of the Pioneer Monument that stands in front of the Carnegie Library today.



His Speech

"Judge Ferdinand Ericksen, in his presentation speech, gave a brief history of all that had been done by the committees and the source of obtaining the necessary funds for the erection of the monument on the beautiful spot on which it stands, and thanked the ecclesiastical authorities for the privilege of locating it there without cost or consideration for an indefinite period of time. He explained in brief, the inscriptions upon the Monument, the names of the persons inscribed, he said, being representative of many nationalities, and among them were names of noted scholars.. musicians, artists, teachers, etc. Men who would, because of their skill and ability, have achieved distinction in any community. He stated in brief that this determined band of fearless and God-fear¬ing men, together with their wives, who shared their labors and who had come here under most adverse conditions; he said that the now vast rich fields with growing crops, were then covered with sage brush, and that the roads, bridges and canals were yet to be constructed, the churches and temples of learning had not then even been planned. The Opera Houses and Amusement houses were unknown. In fact, there were none of the attractions, or features of civilization to induce those pioneers to come, but on the contrary, the existing conditions at that time were such as to discourage."

"Not only were the elements to be subdued and the arid soil made to produce a livelihood, but the roving and uncivilized Indians had to be met and conquered. In conclusion he stated that it was indeed fitting that we perpetuate the names and deeds d such worthy ancestors, and that this was the underlying and controlling thought and desire in erecting the Memorial. He said that he took great pleasure in performing the duties his commission imposed, and presented the Monument to the community in behalf of all those who had in any manner aided in its construction, to honor of all the pioneers, both men and women, who settled in Mt. Pleasant, as a memorial of the esteem in which the pioneers who had made the present Mt. Pleasant possible, were held."

from Mt. Pleasant History pp 188-189; Hilda Madsen Longsdorf
He died on April 20, 1927 in Salt Lake City.
He married Clementina Marion Morrison in December of 1885, a daughter of William and Mary Margaret Farquhar Morrison. New Family Search shows them to be the parents of three children, Clementina Beatrice, William, and Clementina Marian. His wife, Clementina died while giving birth to Clementina Marian.

He was also a partner to Henry Ericksen in the Ericksen Meat and Grocery for short time. Henry was a brother-in-law. Ferdinand had a law office on the second floor of the grocery business.


"In 1898, during the time Ferdinand Ericksen was mayor of the city, the city purchased the north brick schoolhouse, (the now mortuary) corner First North and First West, and in due time, after remodeling it, placing in a heating plant, vaults and cells, suitable furniture, etc.,it became an up-to-date and creditable city hall, and was the first real home the Mt. Pleasant city council had ever known.

The north Public Square was cleared of the brush and burrs, and trees and grass were planted for a city park". from Mt. Pleasant History pp 179-180 by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

Obituary: 
Judge Ferdinand Ericksen, for many years prominent in legal business and political life of Utah, died Wednesday at St. Marks, hospital in Salt Lake City, after an illness of several months.He suffered a heart attack about six month ago and was ordered to a lower altitude by his physician. At that time he went to Dallas, Texas, to visit his sister, Mrs. O. C. Anderson. When his condition became worse he returned to Salt Lake and had been in the hospital since.
Judge Ericksen was active in the Democratic party for many years and was a factor in the development of Sanpete county in a business and political way. He was the son of Utah pioneers, Lars and Christina Hansen Ericksen, born in Mt. Pleasant September 30, 1863. He received his early education in the Sanpete county schools and later attended the Brigham Young academy at Provo. For a time he taught school in Mt. Pleasant and then attended the law school at the University of Michigan where he graduated in 1890. He was admitted to the bar of Michigan and Utah in the same year and returned to Utah to take up his profession. His political life was long and varied. He first entered politics in 1890 when he was elected Sanpete county attorney Later he served as county treasurer and was a candidate for state senator in 1894, but was defeated. In 1897 he was elected mayor of Mt. Pleasant, in which capacity he served for several terms. In 1904 he was elected judge of the Seventh judicial district and served a four year term. The same year he was a delegate in the national Democratic convention at St. Louis, MO. he was also a candidate for Representative in the House of Representatives of the United State. After serving as judge he returned to private practice in Mr. Pleasant. In 1912 Judge Ericksen moved to Salt Lake and became the law partner of the later Marks P. Braffet. This firm handled the legal business for the Utah Fuel company. In 1915 the partnership was dissolved and Judge Ericksen became general counsel for the Fuel company.
He is survived by the following children; Clarence E. Ericksen, Hollywood, Cal.; Mrs,. A. W. Proctor of Sterling, Alberta Canada; Mrs. Obed Nielson, Mt. Pleasant; Mrs E. W. Lambert, William M., F. Harlan, D. Alleen and Elroy L. Ericksen all of Salt Lake. The following brothers and sisters also survive; Mrs. Anderson, Dallas , Texas; Mrs Camilla Noland, Mount Pleasant; Mrs. John Pritchett, Huntington; Mrs. Lena Sorenson Provo, Louis, Orem and Amasa Ericksen, Mt. Pleasant.

Below is the Family group sheet of Ferdinand's Father,  Lars Ericksen.


Wednesday, March 1, 2017

David Candland ~ Pioneer of the Month ~ March 2017



Birth: Oct. 15, 1819
Highgate
Greater London, England
Death: Mar. 4, 1902
Mount Pleasant
Sanpete County
Utah, USA

Son of Samuel Candland and Sarah Betts

Married Mary Ann Barton, 28 Mar 1844, Nauvoo, Hancock, Illinois

Married Mary Jane Webb, 29 Oct 1852

Married Lucile Jones, 9 Apr 1853, later divorced

Married Bertha Mary King, 25 Dec 1854, later divorced

Married Ann Woodhouse, 1 Nov 1855, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Hannah Ann Wright, 5 Mar 1857, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

Married Catherine Ann Jost, 25 Apr 1858, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, later divorced

Children:
Elizabeth Ann Candland McLean (1850 - 1926)*
Abigail Jemima Candland Edmonds (1853 - 1942)*
Delphina Grace Candland (1854 - 1855)*
Eliza Jane Candland (1856 - 1857)*
Samuel Charles Candland (1856 - 1858)*
David Harry Candland (1858 - 1933)*
William David Candland (1858 - 1940)*
Minnie Alena Candland Warner (1859 - 1935)*
James Edward Candland (1861 - 1932)*
George Anthony Candland (1864 - 1912)*
David Alexander Candland (1865 - 1938)*
Walter S. Candland (1866 - 1956)*
Victor Eugene Candland (1867 - 1909)*
Luna Adele Candland Stone (1867 - 1920)*
Amelia M Candland Jensen (1869 - 1955)*
Arthur Charles Candland (1869 - 1938)*
Clara Jessamine Candland Christensen (1870 - 1952)*
Grace M. Candland Jacobsen (1871 - 1953)*
Fannie Vilate Candland Miles (1874 - 1954)*
Lawrence H Candland (1875 - 1954)*
Theodore Clement Candland (1877 - 1960)*
Leland Long Candland (1879 - 1933)*

*Calculated relationship
 https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=143299

The following is research done by Mary Louise Madsen Seamons

taken from Utah State Historical Society.

(not online, incomplete and an unknown author)

Circa 1858-59

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The following  are references to David Candland in the Mt. Pleasant History by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf ...



1861

Early in the spring, David Candland, who had recently' ar­rived from Salt Lake City to make his home in Mount Pleasant, located on some land south of the city and east of the cemetery. There was a spring on this land and on account of the scarcity of water, the people objected to his taking it. Later, a compromise was made, and twenty acres of land in the field was purchased and given him in exchange. In June, Bishop Seeley applied to President Young for the privilege of expending a portion of the tithing funds in building a road north through Thistle Valley. p 69



At a public meeting, held July 14th, W. S. Seeley, David Candland and Perry McArthur were appointed as delegates to a county convention to be held at Ephraim, July 22nd. p. 73

Independence Day this year was duly celebrated as the follow­ing account published in the Deseret News will tell:
"At Mount Pleasant the day was ushered in by the firing musketry as the military of that thriving town have not as yet provided themselves with artillery. The stars and stripes were run up, the military were out in force, and some mounted, others on foot. A procession was formed in which a company of young ladies dressed in white, and school children with flags and banners, occupied conspicuous positions. The local authorities, distinguished visitors and others had places assigned in the procession, the citizens being by far the most numerous division. J. K. McCleanahan, Esq., was the orator of the day and David Candland, Esq., reader. An address was delivered by Col. R. N. Allred, which with songs, toasts and various kinds of music, constituted the principal ceremonies. The dance in the evening was not for­gotten." p 81




Social Hall


A building 30 feet x 45 feet, erected in the south side of the church square, was completed on the 7th day of December. A program consisting of singing and of short and interesting talks by Bishop Seeley and Elders Duncan McArthur, David Candland and J. K. McClenahan was held. David Candland delivered the dedicating prayer, naming the building the Social Hall. p 82
This year, school was commenced in the first, third and fourth wards with David Candland, H. P. Miller and Oscar Winters as teachers with an average of forty pupils in each school. p 83

December 7, 1864, David Candland was duly appoint­ed post master, the first to be officially appointed. The post office was established in his home, the southeast corner on the inter­section of First East and Second South. His wife, Annie Woodhouse Candland acted as post-mistress. At a meeting held Decem­ber 24th, William Morrison, the former Ward Clerk, who had succeeded David Candland, was released, having been called south to Sevier Valley, and Anthon H. Lund was appointed his successor. During this year, H. C. Davidsen and family located in Mount Pleasant, later erecting an Astrometer on his lot on west side of State, southwest corner of intersection of First North. He, some years later, gave talks on astrology to the students of Eli Day's school. At a meeting held in the Social Hall, December 25th, it was decided to build a new meeting house.  p 93




Under date of July 5, 1865, the following letter written by David Candland was published in the Deseret News. "We have erected a bowery 100 x 80 feet. Our crops look rather scant, short in straw and thin on the ground. We have now a mail in our town and you can form no idea of how pleased we are, how much we go on Mr. George W. Bean, the contractor. How much we feel to say Amen to every enterprise that aims to give joy and peace and disseminate intelligence among mankind. We are anxious
now for the wire and the rail and for the speed and proper development of our own dear Utah." Copied from Andrew Madsen's Journal: "At this time, David Candland was a very active man in the community." pp 97, 98

1866
Quoting R. N. Bennett: "David Candland was sent with the epistle for the people of Fairview to move to Mount Pleasant, the people of Fountain Green to Moroni, and the people of Spring City to move to Ephraim. John L. Ivie and myself were sent as Candland's body guards. After these families had moved, the minute men of Mount Pleasant and other settlements had to go as guards for the men while they did their work." p110




Under date of March 12, 1868, the following letter written by David Candland, was published in the Deseret News:

"The progressive is a feature of this new fledged city in the agricultural, mechanical, and spiritual. An important area of land is about to be taken up west and south of the city, which will give to our marriageable young men land so as to lay the foundation of a home for them and the help-mates they may choose. The yellow fever of the Sweetwater or of Marysvale is not strikingly manifest here, because the land movement has fore­stalled it. Bona fide homes are better than the miner's camp.

"Mechanically, we are progressing. Your enterprising agent has now a splendid shingle and saw mill. Lath and picket are to be added, and soon, our town will have a decent array of fenc­ing, nor is he satisfied, but has resolved on a woolen mill, to which we say hurrah, for our town! Other solid improvements are going on, and we must not omit to mention a famous brass band of fifteen instruments which is a feature of this young town.

"Spiritually, we are alive. As an evidence, we have raised $4000 for the emigration, and we are not yet broke, although we have been heavily taxed in various ways in common with the rest of Sanpete. Last Sunday, our Bishop sent out some of our young Elders, two and two, to preach in the several wards of this city, and success has marked the project; they are brought to a proper bearing; the people are benefited; and thus spiritual good is accomplished.


"A great scope of country will be put under cultivation for ourselves and the poor for whom we have subscribed, and for as many more, if they will only come. As we believe, more folks, more trades, more independence, and more grain preserved, in our town.

"An eight foot vein of coal of excellent quality has been developed at Fairview, four miles from town, regular Sanpete coal.

This will open the Spanish Fork Canyon road to a certainty. The discoverers are practical colliers, and intend to sell cheap. Utah County can rejoice, for the abundance is great, and the price will be small. Ah, sir! If we only had a railroad down the canyon to Goshen depot, then we would hustle the coal to your city at such figures for the blacksmith and others as would make them all rejoice. As a city, we are interested in our near neighbors' welfare, as we are bound to prosper in their prosperity.



"A Sunday School grows in importance, and so do our five day schools. The demand for a high school is beginning to loom up and also for the appliances needed, maps, charts, globes and thorough teacher. Nor must I forget to mention that the 'News' has taken a new start since you took the chair; (I don't call it the 'easy chair'), and when the opening spring opens the granary doors, and the tons of millions of promised grass-hoppers shall have been undeveloped, and the sun shines that will thaw out the frozen feeling of dread or famine, they, the liberal-hearted will respond to your call for help; broad acres will be sown, and strong belief in the promise of the rainbow will be evidenced. God will give us seed-time and harvest, for we have helped marvelously as a people, to gather the poor, and we sow not for ourselves alone, but for Him and His people and His insect tribes. To Him we look for the promised blessing of the former and latter rains.

"In these days of XXX's, I must not omit to mention the superiority of the Mount Pleasant flouring mill, now thoroughly renovated, with improved machinery, and the finest bolting cloth. The enterprising owners mean your tyros shall test the quality. Nor can we pass our fine blacksmith shops, among whom George Farnsworth as a shoer stands 'A number one.''' pp 120-122


Excerpts from the city record: "Spoke of the necessity of repairing streets, bridges, etc., but it was impossible for the people ~o pay a great deal of money on tax; motion prevailed that a tax of one-half of one per cent be levied for the year 1871." . . . "July 22, motion carried that Joseph Day be city assessor and collector and that he be allowed ten per cent of the city assessments for services in the same." . . . "Motion carried that an appropriation be made for the mayor to purchase the city ordinance of the city of San Francisco of David Candland" . . . "October 15th, Magnus Rosenberg was granted a three months license to sell spiritous and vinous liquors. License granted at $15 a quarter or $40 a year."
pp 135,136

The council took into consideration the plausibility of building a city hall and jail. Moved and seconded to build same, at least as far as to finish the basement, or lower rooms this year. . . . . Salt Lake City ordinances were adopted. . . . . David Candland appointed city attorney. . . .p 147




December 30, 1877, three weeks later.

"A special meeting of the city council was held October 24, 1877, to consider the propriety of building a Lockup, with height enough to admit a general office above, giving room for all city purposes, and thereby save renting and contingent expenses. After some discussion as to finances, etc., Mr. A. H. Bennett presented a bid in three divisions, one for finished Lockup, $275.00, one for Lockup with additional rooms above, $375.00, and one for Lockup with temporary roof for less than $275.00. Council decided that time and necessity for the building and the known honor of the contracting party, no further bids would be asked and the contract was given Mr. -Bennett, agreeable to the con­tingency that may arise as to finances in the matter of completion.

"The signed contract, with two signers was duly signed and placed on file in recorder Candland's office, . . . . . the building was completed and received by the city. Corporation notes for $250.00 were given to Mr. Bennett who delivered two keys to the mayor who delivered them to the marshal who was instructed to get bedding, etc. Councilor Peter Monsen was authorized to purchase a suitable stove." p 154





Wednesday, February 1, 2017

James Borg and wife Sarah Marie Jorgensen Borg and their children ~ Pioneers of the Month ~ February 2017

Borg, James
James Borg was born in Sweden, September 26, 1852. His parents joined the L. D. S. church in their native land and came to Utah in the early '60s. He engaged in freighting to the mining towns in Nevada and also owned a farm near Chester. He learned the harness maker's trade, and for many years was associated with the firm of Clemensen ; Borg. He served during the Black Hawk Indian wars. He married Sarah Jorgensen one of the first white children born in this city, September 26, 1882. They resided here until moving to Salt Lake City in 1924. 
Borg, Sarah Marie Jorgensen
 
Mrs. Sarah M. Borg,
She was born Sept. 11, 1859, in Mt. Pleasant, and is believed to have been the first girl born in the town.
She was the daughter of Jens and Christiania Jensen Jorgensen.
She was the widow of James Borg, Mt. Pleasant pioneer, whom she married in the Salt Lake LDS temple in 1882.
She was the mother of three children, Dr. Georgia B. Johnson and Mrs. Mabel Borg Jenkins, Salt Lake City; a son, Kenneth Borg, Salt Lake City;
 
Birth:
Sep. 11, 1859, Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County,Utah, USA
Death:  Jan. 26, 1946, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Borg Children 
Borg Children
Georgia,Mabel and
Kenneth
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




Borg, Georgia




  



Dr. Georgia Borg Johnson
Professor at University of Southern California.
PhD from Columbia University, New York

 


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 
 
Mabel Borg Jenkins
She graduated from Julliard School of Music.
She taught at McCune School of Music
and the University of Utah.
Two of her students are internationally
famed pianists
Grant Johanesen and Lowell Farr. 
Johannesen paid  tribute to Mabel Borg Jenkins,
his treasured teacher, who, above all,
wanted to discover what made him "different."
She encouraged him to return to Utah i
n the summers but otherwise to "occupy the world."
 
 
Borg, obit_edited
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 
Borg, Perry Kenneth

Perry Kenneth Borg
was an engineer he worked for the
United Stated Government,
developing airport sites, including
the Salt Lake City Airport.









































Sunday, January 1, 2017

Henry Peter Olsen and wife Lucy Ann Spencer ~ Pioneers of the Month ~ January 2017







      As a boy his home conditions were humble of a pioneer nature.        

  Other pioneers had great respect